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Seattle Exploring Non-GON Ways to Address Adoption Gap

January 21, 2016

Last week Governing magazine’s Tod Newcombe delved into broadband adoption rates in tech-savvy Seattle. Newcombe said that, while 85 percent of Emerald City residents have adopted broadband (a rate much higher than the national average of 75 percent), the adoption rate had reached a plateau. Newcombe reported, “[C]ity officials are trying to understand why” more …

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U.S. Broadband Getting Faster As Capacity “Grows Across The Country”

March 30, 2015

According to Akamai Technology’s most recent quarterly report, peak broadband speeds in the U.S. increased 16 percent between the fourth quarter of 2013 and the fourth quarter of 2014. (The year-over-year average increase across the globe was 20 percent.) The average peak speed was 49.4 Mbps. The average connection speed overall was up 15 percent …

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Round Two: 11 Cities Split on Vote to Adopt UTOPIA Network

July 25, 2014

In June, the Coalition for the New Economy reported leaders in Utah proposed partnering the state’s ailing government-owned broadband network (GON), UTOPIA, with an Australian finance firm, Macquarie Capital. We noted the agreement would allow the 11 localities to retain ownership of the system (Macquarie would manage and finish building the system), but would also …

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Government-Owned Broadband Review of the Week: Cedar Falls, Iowa

July 15, 2014

Today the Coalition for the New Economy continues its look at the recent study of government-owned broadband networks (GONs) from New York Law School by examining the report’s case study on Cedar Falls, Iowa. According to authors Charles Davidson and Michael Santorelli, the city’s GON was established in the mid-1990s and is one of the …

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Government-Owned Broadband, Not Just An American Issue

June 20, 2014

Proponents of government-owned broadband systems, like Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, are fond of saying taxpayer networks are necessary to boost broadband competition and, therefore, reduce prices and improve service for customers.  But as the Coalition for the New Economy has pointed out in Tennessee, it was GON supporters who wanted to raise fees …

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More Speaking Out Against Proposed FCC Broadband Policy

June 18, 2014

Last week, the Coalition for the New Economy reported that more than 70 U.S. lawmakers had written to ask Federal Communication Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler to rethink the FCC’s new policy that will allow it to intervene to overturn state and local laws aimed at ensuring government-owned broadband networks (GONs) operate on the same …

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U.S. Winning the Broadband Race Over Europe

June 16, 2014

Coalition for the New Economy blog readers know we’ve repeatedly tried to debunk the myth that the U.S. is falling behind the rest of the world, particularly Europe, when it comes to access to high-speed broadband. Here’s another story to add to our list of proof: according to a recent Financial Times news story, “The …

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Lawmakers Urge FCC Chairman To Rethink His Position on GON’s

June 13, 2014

A group of lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives yesterday sent a letter to Federal Communications Chairman Tom Wheeler asking him, as the Coalition for the New Economy has done, to rethink his position on government-owned broadband. (As a reminder, Chairman Wheeler wants to use FCC authority to overturn state laws that require GONs …

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Broadband Completion In Austin Is A Win-Win For Consumers

June 9, 2014

As this map from Community Broadband Networks indicates, Austin, Tex. does not have a community broadband network. The map also indicates there are “barriers” in Texas that may inhibit taxpayer-owned networks. So what does this mean for competition in Austin? While municipal broadband supporters would have people believe it means less competition, slower speeds and …

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Failed Municipal Network Leaves Taxpayers Footing the Bill

June 6, 2014

In Groton, Conn. and Provo, Utah city leaders approved plans to sell their failed municipal broadband networks for $1 each. (The systems each cost more than $35 million.) We thought those bad deals were pretty bad until we read a post from RStreet.Com about Utah’s UTOPIA network. (See the Coalition for the New Economy’s paper …

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